Recruiter In Korea

The Honest Truth About Recruiting in Korea

Archive for December 7th, 2009

A sign of the times to come?

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Looks like elementary schools are seeing record low enrollment rates. Likely attributed to the declining birth rate along with wealthier Koreans seeking education for their children outside of Korea (good on them) but could also mean less need for after-school academies and less need for manpower for English programs in public schools. Of course this will probably not have an effect for several more years but one must wonder what it will be like in 20 or 30 years if the birth rate does not rise.

The birth rate is an issue that can’t be resolved too quickly but I think we can all agree that there must be major reforms to the public education system in Korea. Of course this part made me laugh:

Despite the decline in the number of students, the number of schools has increased. There are eight new schools among the 586 elementary schools in Seoul, 374 middle schools with five new ones and 308 high schools with six being new.

Not really thinking ahead, are we?

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December 7, 2009 at 4:33 pm

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Some truths about headhunters (recruiters)

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I like Mint Resumes a lot because the writer posts many things that are relevant to my job. I read a lot of other HR/recruiting blogs but usually it’s a different ball game compared to what recruiters do here in Korea.

Anyways, here’s an interesting post from Mint.

Be an honorable client – don’t screw over your recruiter. How do candidates do that? By being difficult and changing your mind about the amount of salary you want, after telling the recruiter a lower range. By pouting over a title you feel you should have – when it’s way out of the ballpark for the particular employer you’re talking to. The above actions torpedo your candidacy big time. In effect, you’re saying to the employer, “Forget about everything I said and did to make you want me – this is what I’m really like.”

They need you to perform when you get the job. The search is over, you’ve inked the contract, champagne corks are popping and the hiring company is excited. It’s been a long job search. You feel exhausted. The first day of work comes and you’re a no-show. Someone completely different from the person they interviewed shows up. The spark, the attitude, that drive – they’re missing. The candidate? DOA. Nothing is a larger disappointment. You create an image during the interviewing process – you’ve got to live up to it on the job. Don’t make your recruiter look like a liar.

You don’t get placed, they don’t get paid. Recognize that it’s a buyer’s market for talent right now. Many recruiters are working strictly on a commission with much less front money (if any) than they received 18 months ago. If this were a reality show in the UK it might be called “Strictly Come Recruiting.” The recruiter needs to complete the search and fill the job with the best possible candidate – someone who will be a great living, breathing advertisement for the recruiter’s skills. That’s you, ducks. The really memorable candidates for recruiters are people who perform and lead the employer back to the recruiter for seconds, thirds, and more.

When you’re hired and perform for the employer, you’re also cementing yourself as a winner in the mind of the recruiter – which will come in quite handy when you’re ready for the next opportunity.

Lots of you hate recruiters in Korea, I know, but trust me that we get screwed over plenty by candidates as well. I’ve always ascertained that you should use as many recruiters as possible when searching for a job. However, when you’ve found the one you want and signed on the dotted line (and sent your documents in), don’t try to change the contract or conditions. You’re showing a different side of you but not in a good way if you try to pull this. You can also believe me that you won’t be very successful in doing so. Research the job and make sure that you’re good to go. Otherwise you’ll look like an ass.

I’ve mentioned here that it’s in the best interest of your recruiter that you do a good job and complete your contract. An honest recruiter will work hard to put you in a reputable position. Don’t screw him over by performing poorly!

Written by recruiterinkorea

December 7, 2009 at 4:18 pm

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Wow, where did all these hits come from?

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My hits shot up quite a bit today but I don’t know where they are coming from. I kind of feel bad for not posting for the past several days so I’ll do my best to be more consistent.

Thanks to all my readers and as always, ideas and questions are always welcome!

Written by recruiterinkorea

December 7, 2009 at 4:07 pm

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How much does an agency make per head?

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I received an email from a reader awhile ago regarding how much recruiters make per successful placement. I think most of you know the general fee (around $1,000 USD or 1,000,000 KRW) but it does vary on different factors. Some agencies accept a flat fee usually in the 1 million KRW range regardless of the instructor’s credentials. However, most agencies have different tiers or levels they assign to their fees. For example, a fresh college grad with a non-English/Education degree will fetch a million. If he/she has an English or education-related degree, the fee is increased to 1.1 and perhaps 1.2 for one or two years of experience. Keep in mind that each year of experience does not constitute a continual increase. There will likely be various ranges (ex. 1-2 years=100,000 KRW extra, 2-4 years=200,000 KRW extra).

Now if you’re a Harvard Ed. grad (even with no experience), I’ve seen some recruiters charge up to 2 million KRW, sometimes even more. The problem with attracting instructors from big name education schools is that they usually don’t want to come to Korea and teaching jobs are relatively plentiful (compared to other industries) even in a sinking economy.

However, I did mention here that due to the shoddy economy, many recruiters are not getting full fees. As a matter of fact, some are practically giving candidates away due to the sheer number of applicants relative to open positions. This pretty much sucks for everyone: the schools, recruiters, and applicants alike.

Written by recruiterinkorea

December 7, 2009 at 4:06 pm

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I’m back

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Sorry for the prolonged absence but I took a little break. Will get this blog back on track!!

Written by recruiterinkorea

December 7, 2009 at 1:54 am

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