Recruiter In Korea

The Honest Truth About Recruiting in Korea

Archive for May 10th, 2010

Whats the dropout rate for ESL teachers?

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This is an interesting discussion on ESL Cafe regarding the dropout rate of ESL instructors.  I do have data on this somewhere from my years of experience at my current agency but can’t seem to dig it up.  Okay I’m too lazy to look for it but I’m sure the number was somewhere around 10% within one year.  Ttompatz puts it best and I believe his number was fairly accurate:

It has been my personal experience that about 15% leave in less than 1 year, about 50% leave after 1 year and 90% are gone within 5 years.

GEPIK has seen retention rates along the same lines with small variations EXCEPT in the last 2 years where recruitment and retention rates are MUCH higher than usual.

I would imagine that the rates for early departures would escalate as you move farther south or east and isolation and culture shock become more extreme.

Hakwons on the other hand have historically had bad recruitment and retention rates especially among some of the more notorious chain schools.

By and large their reputations are well deserved.

In my experience though, I would say that more than 50% leave after one year.  Of course it depends on many factors such as location, recruitment process, but most importantly, the person.  As a recruitment agency, we’re more than happy as long as the instructor completes the first year (hell, we would actually love to see them leave so that we could bring in a new body); it’s the ones that quit after a month (or even a day), that we have to worry about.

I’ve managed to develop a keen eye for the possible dropouts so I could avoid moving forward with them if possible.

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Written by recruiterinkorea

May 10, 2010 at 2:38 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Salaries on the Increase?

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Was doing some competitive analysis of several hagwons and public schools and noticed that salaries at some of the big named academies in Korea have increased their salaries for English instructors from the time I did the same study about 6 months ago.  Bear in mind that it wasn’t much but at least 3 of the schools that I looked at had their base salaries increase by at least 100,000 KRW per month.

Granted it wasn’t all the schools that I looked at but there wasn’t a decrease in salary anywhere.  Chain schools tend to be more strict about negotiating salaries as they tend to have ranges that are in line with education and experience.  Hopefully this is a sign that the economy is finally turning around, which may ultimately be bad for us recruiters (and schools).

Last summer was a breeze in terms of reaching the numbers but not all recruiters were being paid in full.

Written by recruiterinkorea

May 10, 2010 at 1:53 pm

Posted in Uncategorized